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Child Support

Child Support

Child support is paid during or after a divorce, dissolution, or legal separation. Child support is typically ordered to be paid by the non-residential parent to the residential parent. In Ohio, child support is calculated based on the income of the parents, health insurance cost, and daycare cost among other factors. A common misconception is that child support automatically terminates once the child(ren) reach the age of eighteen. Child support orders can continue until the child(ren) no longer attend an accredited high school on a full-time basis or reach the age of nineteen. The Ohio Child Support Guidelines provide a formula for calculating child support, which is designed to ensure that children receive the financial support they need.

The amount of child support ordered is determined by the Ohio Child Support Guidelines as required by Ohio Revised Code sections 3119.021 and 3119.022. Child support obligations are calculated using the Basic Child Support Schedule and either the Sole/Shared Child Support Computation Worksheet or the Split Parenting Child Support Computation Worksheet. The Sole/Shared Worksheet is utilized in most circumstances. The Split Worksheet is only used when both parties are the residential parent of at least one child. 

The first step in determining child support in Ohio is to calculate each parent's gross income. This includes all sources of income, including wages, salaries, bonuses, commissions, and rental income. Once the gross income of each parent is determined, certain deductions are made, such as taxes and mandatory retirement contributions, to arrive at the net income of each parent.

The Ohio Child Support Guidelines provide a chart that specifies the basic child support obligation based on the combined net income of the parents and the number of children involved. This basic child support obligation is then divided between the parents based on each parent's share of the combined net income. For example, if one parent has a net income of $50,000 and the other parent has a net income of $30,000, the first parent would be responsible for paying approximately 62.5% of the basic child support obligation, and the second parent would be responsible for paying approximately 37.5%.

It is important to note that the Ohio Child Support Guidelines are only a starting point for calculating child support. In some cases, a court may deviate from the guidelines based on other factors, such as the needs of the children or the financial resources of the parents. It is important to work with an experienced Ohio family law attorney to ensure that your child support order is fair and appropriate.

In conclusion, child support in Ohio is determined based on a number of factors, including each parent's income, the number of children, and the amount of time each parent spends with the children. The Ohio Child Support Guidelines provide a formula for calculating child support, and the Ohio Child Support Worksheet is used to calculate each parent's child support obligation. If you are going through a divorce or custody case involving children, it is important to work with an experienced family law attorney to ensure that your child support order is fair and appropriate.

Fogt Law Can Help You.

You can depend on Attorney Christopher M. Fogt's experience and knowledge as well as his trial skills to ensure that you receive the best possible outcome. 

Attorney Fogt practices Family Law in Montgomery County, Greene County, Clark County, and Warren County. He has and is willing to practice in other counties on request.

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